Visit my sales sites and feel free to leave your friendly comments -- or just say HI! thanks, Cathy

C Wright Art Gallery on Facebook --

C Wright Art Gallery and mystore4u on Ebay for cool deals on clothes, shoes and more --
Listia --trading spot -- http://www.listia.com/signup/82344

I try to post all things new for my many sites on Twitter --it is my new bulletin board http://twitter.com/mystore4u





Saturday, December 31, 2011

" Hiding Fox" 11x14 original acrylic painting on canvas red fox abstract unique


Paint still wet when took the pictures 
 --so keep that in mind while looking .


OOAK
one of a kind paintings
abstract
 " Hiding Fox " 
by
C. Wright
12-31-11

 11x14 original acrylic painting on  canvas

    Photobucket

http://members.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewUserPage&userid=cwrightartgallery

This is the coolest thing ---- art shows up in the 

most interesting places ---

 everything is  art !!!

Happy New Year !!!     

Tiny Bubbles: Favorite Drinks, Once Magnified, 

Become Art

By Tiffany Hagler-Geard


New Year’s  Cocktail

New Year’s Eve is a time for merriment and drinking. Nothing rings in the new year like a glass of bubbly but have you ever wondered what exactly is going into our bodies as we sing Auld Lang Syne? At FSU’s chemistry department, in correlation with Bevshots, scientists have taken classic cocktails and magnified them up to 1000 times, producing some  breathtaking images reminiscent of Kandinsky, and other abstract painters. All images can be purchased at the Bevshots website.

ht vodka jef 111230 wblog Tiny Bubbles: Favorite Drinks, Once Magnified, Become Art
Just like snowflakes no two beverage crystals are exactly the same. An up-close-and-personal view of vodka is shown here.

ht scotch jef 111230 wblog Tiny Bubbles: Favorite Drinks, Once Magnified, Become Art
With a process developed at Florida State University, BevShots, based in Tallahassee, Fla., produces colorful images of wine, liquor and beer magnified up to 1,000 times. The company sells them to buyers as works of art. “Each image is a picture of beverage crystals taken through the lens of a polarized light microscope,” said Lester Hutt, the company’s president.  Scotch is shown here.

ht white wine jef 111230 wblog Tiny Bubbles: Favorite Drinks, Once Magnified, Become Art
A microscopic picture of white wine is shown here. These colorful microscopic “shots” of alcoholic drinks reveal the incredible molecules that make up our favorite potent potables.  They are sold as art works for buyers who appreciate the kaleidoscopic effects of the booze.

ht tequila jef 111230 wblog Tiny Bubbles: Favorite Drinks, Once Magnified, Become Art
Next time you take a shot of tequila, remember that this is what it looks like when you zoom in.

ht red wine jef 111230 wblog Tiny Bubbles: Favorite Drinks, Once Magnified, Become Art
Depending on the difficulty of crystallizing a beverage, the process can take anywhere from four weeks to more than six months. Red wine crystals are captured in this image.

ht champagne jef 111230 wblog Tiny Bubbles: Favorite Drinks, Once Magnified, Become Art
A microscopic view of a glass of bubbly is shown here.

ht cola jef 111230 wblog Tiny Bubbles: Favorite Drinks, Once Magnified, Become Art
This is the only non-alcoholic beverage magnified– who knew each drop of a popular soft drink  could look like this? A microscopic picture of Coca Cola taken in the chemistry department of Florida State University in Tallahassee, Fla.

ht light beer jef 111230 wblog Tiny Bubbles: Favorite Drinks, Once Magnified, Become Art
To form the crystals, Lester Hutt said drops of a beverage are placed on a glass microscope slide to dry out. As the cocktail dries, the ingredients and impurities form crystals. To find crystals beautiful enough to use as art, Michael Davidson, the scientist who shot the images, often creates more than 200 slides of the same drink. A close-up image of American light beer is photographed here.

ht pina colada jef 111230 wblog Tiny Bubbles: Favorite Drinks, Once Magnified, Become Art
The variation in color and shape comes from the composition of the crystals, Hutt said. Some mixed cocktails, such as Pina Colada (shown here), contain a lot of sugar, which forms crystals differently than liquors like vodka with fewer impurities, he said.

ht mexican beer jef 111230 wblog Tiny Bubbles: Favorite Drinks, Once Magnified, Become Art
The colors may look like they’re manipulated by photo-editing software, but Hutt said they are real as real can be. As the polarized microscope light passes through the crystals, the light is refracted and creates a rainbow. The many colors of Mexican beer are show here.

found this article here ---- http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2011/12/tiny-bubbles-your-favorite-drinks-magnified/

Thursday, December 29, 2011

I have just added the new google+ thingy to my blogs --- or the other way around ---for my art blog anyway --hope I know what I am doing !!
Thanks for your patience in this matter anyway!

Saturday, December 17, 2011

Artist's Homemade Christmas Cards !

Artists' Homemade Christmas Cards



Holiday Cards Glee Mail Arp
This is an interesting look at artist's Christmas cards !
check out the link to the slideshow --- 
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/multimedia/photos/?c=y&articleID=69320392&page=1

Sunday, December 4, 2011

How does the color affect the mood?

Andy Warhol's Marilyn Prints


In the 1960s, Andy Warhol created several “mass-produced” images from photographs of celebrities such as Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley and Jackie Onassis.
Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was a key figure in Pop Art, an art movement that emerged in America and elsewhere in the 1950s to become prominent over the next two decades.
The Fauves used non-representational color and representational form to convey different sensations. Apply the same idea to the portrait of Marilyn Monroe below, using the controls to adjust the colors. How does the color affect the mood?
Unlike the Fauve colors, the non-representational colors of Pop Art do not depict the artist’s inner sensation of the world. They refer to the popular culture, which also inspires Warhol to experiment with the technique of silkscreen printing, a popular technique used for mass production. In doing so, Warhol moves away from the elitist avant-garde tradition. Initially, many spectators received this new marriage between art and commodity culture with little enthusiasm.
Warhol discusses his choice of color in this 1981 recording. Press the play button to listen to his comments.
On the occasion of Marilyn Monroe’s suicide in August 1962, Warhol used this image for his screenprinting. It was a publicity shot by Gene Korman for the film Niagara, made in 1953.

Saturday, October 29, 2011

" Fish Food " 11x14 original acrylic painting on canvas fish folk art unique

OOAK
one of a kind paintings

 " Fish Food " 
by
C. Wright
10-29-11

 11x14 original acrylic painting on  canvas

 *****************
This set was inspired by a small rug I have with fish in it .
One day I looked at the rug and thought about painting fish. 
I had no clue what it would turn out like and then I thought about small fish being eaten by bigger fish and so on until I got this painting !!

I brushed a blue and green background with a sponge brush and put some texture in it for water .
There are red and yellow fish with the white dots to add a little  folk art look  .
 These fish are fish food to a bigger fish --- right ??
A fun painting and will add some fun to any decor !


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some of the colors --  blue, green , red , white and yellow
 

**********************************
** This is  one of a kind OOAK original 11x14 inch painting on stretched canvas .
** signed on front and back
**I will include a certificate of authenticity for each one .
**********************************
 
Paint still wet when took the pictures --- and 
the pictures seem to be lighter color than the actual painting --so keep that in mind while looking .
Thanks !

Sunday, October 9, 2011

5 Ways to Grow as an Artist

5 Ways to Grow as an Artist

So how would a Cassatt or a Henri or Picasso approach painting differently than we do today? How might this heartfelt fear of others controlling our painting process impact our self-understanding as artists? Here are five possible answers:

1. Making a successful picture is not the goal. Think of periods, such as childhood, when we grew, our self-understanding changed and we became more of who we are. There was an endless stream of events where we expressed ourselves and slowly began to discover the things that pleased us. As with the sense of freedom characterized above, the entire payoff was growth. The events of life when we grow are the things that happen along the way. Making art should be exactly the same. Paintings are just the series of events or steps we take. Let them go. Keep moving. Or as Henri implored, “Keep living.”

2. The painting process is always a beginning. As soon as the freshness evaporates (we are bored or lost or acquire interest in something else), stop. Do not think in terms of finishing. Picasso lectures eloquently on this. Finish is the death of our work because it means we are painting an expectation or “to be like” and that puts the brakes on painting to see and feel more deeply. Every beginning is a new prompt, a new point of departure. Begin everything. Finish nothing.

3. Ignore non-artist authorities. Juries, the grantors, the gallery, the direction from above are just so many fingers in our pie. All external measures are dangerous because they not only push us to performing, as opposed to creating, but their sense of worth takes over our own. This is precisely what Parisian artists fought against.

4. Get into a prolonged creative process. Have dozens of paintings in your studio that have been abandoned for one reason or another, left in various stages, unfinished but always complete as expressions of who you were at that moment. Work on several paintings simultaneously. You are not making shoes.

5. Furnish the world with your beauty, let the world see, touch and feel who you are.Scary I know. It is so much easier to hide within safe fortresses, the sources of praise and dignity that we can count on by pleasing our audience. This is the dreaded condition called style. We cannot be free to be who we are if we are not always risking being who we are in front of others.

What about the career, you ask? The painters of Paris were incredibly ambitious but their big career move, as it turned out, was biting the hand that fed them. Career yes, but freedom to become is holy ground. No Faustian deals, please. Therefore, we may put an entrepreneurial hat on once we put down the brush, but never when it limits our becoming. The assembly line to the great gallery opening is every artist’s kiss of death.
The life of Franz Schubert may suggest a model. He was so into the process of creating music that each of his new efforts was but an opportunity for little Franzel to become more Schubert. So, he would compose the work, let it go and move on. His students would then find the work, practice it and perform it for him afterwards, whereupon Schubert is reported to have said, “My, that is lovely. Who wrote it?”
This is the way to make art. Move in the direction of the greatest pleasure and excitement. You are gifted. Risk showing us your gift. Where others are drowning, you will be diving. And it is when you cannot be bothered with product, you will look about the studio and find a few pieces that have a life. Your life. And so you gather them up and market them. And then after 30 years of painting, you will have had a career and the “later” you will have emerged. You will have grown. And you will have been an artist.
Ah, those Parisians. They had a way.

found this article here ---
http://painting.about.com/od/inspiration/a/JFresia_Paris.htm

SOLD ---- " Angel in the Clouds " 8x10 acrylic original painting



OOAK
one of a kind painting

" Angel in the Clouds "

by
C. Wright
8-31-08

8x10 inch acrylic painting on mixed media paper.
Easy to frame !!

Sunday, September 18, 2011

Vincent Van Gogh quote

"Great things are not done by impulse, 


but by a series of small

 things brought together." - 
Vincent Van Gogh

Friday, September 16, 2011

A chance to win an art supply package -- FREE !


A chance to win an art supply package -- FREE !

All you have to do is LIKE my art page on Facebook  --- easy as easy can get !!!

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

What is Visionary Art ??


Like love, you know it when you see it. But here's the longer definition, straight out of our Mission Statement: "Visionary art as defined for the purposes of the American Visionary Art Museum refers to art produced by self-taught individuals, usually without formal training, whose works arise from an innate personal vision that revels foremost in the creative act itself." In short, visionary art begins by listening to the inner voices of the soul, and often may not even be thought of as 'art' by its creator .

American Visionary Art Museum
check it  out
http://www.avam.org/

Saturday, August 27, 2011

C Wright Art Gallery gives away 6 pc art supply package


C Wright Art Gallery gives away 6 pc art supply package ( what you see in the picture -- 2 8x10 canvas 1 sponge roller 1 


sponge brush 2 bristle brushes -- all new ) to one of the lucky people to like this page . Drawing will be held when this page 


reaches 100 LIKES. All you have to do is LIKE this page !! Right now there are 8 and they will also be included in the drawing


 !! Good Luck --- pass the word !!! Thanks !!




C Wright Art Gallery

I have a facebook page too !

LIKE my facebook page so you can comment with your artwork , crafts, etc. !


C Wright Art Gallery page on Facebook

Friday, August 19, 2011

Do you have an interesting art ??

I would like to hear from you if you have art that is a little different !! I want to hear from all of you and you can follow me and comment to put yopur link out there !!
Don't be shy --- sho off that artwork !!

Friday, August 12, 2011

Sooooo Cool --- Literary Reflections






Literary Reflections: Interactive Mirror Draws Readers In
Everyone loves a good fairy tale. The whimsical characters and fantastical events capture our imaginations and might even serve to teach us a lesson or two. This magical mirror from Romy van den Broek lets fairy tale lovers of any age actually become part of the story. Although it looks like a floor mirror, it is actually a large, highly reflective touch screen equipped with motion capture technology. As the story progresses, the user interacts with the setting and characters in a variety of very cool ways. For example, in the story Hansel and Gretel, the viewer picks up stones to help Hansel and the story doesn’t progress until the task is completed.
http://gajitz.com/literary-reflections-interactive-mirror-draws-readers-in/
Involving readers (particularly young ones) in literature is a sure way to foster a life-long love of reading.
By bringing the landscape of the story to life while telling the story aloud, the mirror lets young readers become immersed in fairy tales like never before. The user actually becomes the main character and performs some of the activities the character performs in the book. It’s almost like a video game or an interactive movie, but it is actually encouraging an interest in classic stories. The shape of the screen calls to mind a number of classic fairy tales in which a magic mirror is itself a main character. The name itself, Through the Looking Glass, is an allusion to Lewis Carroll’s tales of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.




Thursday, August 11, 2011

My granddaughter is an artist !!








Set of 2
8x10 canvas paintings
Carriage and Unicorn
Original Acrylic Art
by
Joslynn
8-8-11
(Check out her signature -- has a peace symbol --- how cool is that !)

This is a wonderful start to this 7 (almost 8) year old little girl's art career !!
She has an artistic talent ( not bragging just because she is my granddaughter ).
She asked me if I could please list this for her because she wants to buy more art supplies .
Of course, I said I would !!

This is a set of 2 canvases -- painted on sides .

A unicorn is leading the way to pick up the Princess for the ball !!
The unicorn has wings , horn and pink mane / tail.
The carriage is lovely and driven by a man with a black top hat.
She sponge rolled the purple background.
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some of the colors -- purple , white , pink , black and beige


**********************************
** These are one of a kind OOAK original 8x10 inch paintings on stretched canvas .
** signed on front and back
**She will include a thank you letter with this set .
**********************************

I hope you can give this artist her exciting start selling her artwork .
She will be so happy to buy more supplies so she can continue to create !

Monday, July 25, 2011

Invitation to post your work !!

You can follow me and comment with a link to your work. 
Let us all get inspired by other artists !!

Sunday, July 17, 2011

latest ---- Set of 2 Floral 11x14 original acrylic painting canvas

 " Set of 2 Floral " 
by
C. Wright
7-17-11

Photobucket

Two  11x14 original acrylic paintings on   canvas

 *****************

This set was inspired by a set of drapes I saw .

I brushed a brown background .
There are brown stems with green leaves and vines .
Red and white flowers  which bloom to a mix of other colors.

A nice pair / set of paintings to add to any decor !

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some of the colors -- red , white , browns , blue and green
 

**********************************
** These are one of a kind OOAK original 11x14 inch paintings on stretched canvas .
** signed on front and back
**I will include a certificate of authenticity for each one .
********************************** 

Saturday, July 16, 2011

ISABEL and RUBEN TOLEDO





ISABEL & RUBEN TOLEDO
“I do what I do because I love to do it,” cries the passionate, acclaimed fashion designer Isabel Toledo who, in addition to other achievements, designed the gown First Lady Michelle Obama wore at her husband’s inauguration. Join host John Jacobsen as he strolls through Isabel’s atelier, and take a peek at the eclectic New York studio of her husband Ruben Toledo, as he creates. How do you define art? “Feeling!” says Ruben. “Spirit!” says Isabel. Two of the peak designers working today, Isabel and Ruben Toledo represent a quarter century of being in love and building their potent design brand, and they agree on at least one thing: “Art is discovery.” Isabel, long considered one of fashion’s true innovators, has been called by Geoffrey Beene, “a major talent, one of the secrets of American fashion.” Ruben, whose work encompasses everything from designing for the world’s leading stores to illustrations in publications such as The New Yorker, Details and Vogue, talk about craft, process, teamwork, and their inspiring life as a married couple…in the arts. Says Ruben, “…we’re all born with that secret key that gives you the power to unlock your ideas.” Find the key, with The Artist Toolbox.


http://www.theartisttoolbox.com/index.php/theartists/Isabel+%26+Ruben+Toledo